Tag Archives: base jumping

Thread the Needle Base Jump Will Stop Your Heart-Extreme Video

Watch closely because base jumper extraordinaire Uli Emanuele is about to thread the needle so to speak through a hole in a rock formation somewhere in Switzerland. Uli measured the hole at 2 meters and 60-70 centimeters, which approximately equals 104 inches or 8 feet 8 inches.

Uli2

We do not know at what speed Uli is traveling, but at an altitude of 600 metres, with a free-fall of at least 300 metres, a jumper is traveling at approximately 120 mph. (1) Therefore, Uli will hit the blue hole in the rock in the picture above at a speed of at least 80-100 mph. If he has an average sleeve length of 33-35 inches, Uli will have a wing span of 5’6″-5’10”. Subtracting that from the estimated hole width of 8’8″ leaves Uli with only 1.5 feet of clearance on either side of the hole, at a speed of 80-100 mph. That does not leave much room for error.

Uli must be spot on where he aims his body. If there is a slight downdraft or updraft when he flies through the hole, that may force him off course and he may hit one of his hands on the rock. That collision would probably push the rest of his body smack dab into the rock. Uli would then merely be a glob of primordial ooze inside the eye of the needle he must thread. I do not envy his chances.

We know that it is possible for Uli to lose his life if he misses the hole, his eye of the needle as we have said. Please remember that base jumping videos can be extremely exciting and stressful for the viewer, even unhealthy if the viewer has compromised health. If you have a heart condition, be sure to have your heart medication nearby along with your phone if you need to call for medical assistance. Remember, you have been warned.

Base jumping videos should all be watched in full screen mode to allow yourself to be caught up in the action and the thrill of the moment. Once you start the video, be sure to switch to full screen mode right away. NSFW.

Uli you studmuffin, you! You the man, dude! Wow, what a jump! Right through the eye of the needle!

If you, the viewer, got caught up in the action a bit too much and are now experiencing a heart attack, first and foremost, Calm Down! Number two take some of your heart medication. Three dial 9-1-1 in the U.S., 9-9-9 in Great Britain, 1-1-2 in most of Europe or whatever the digits are for a medical emergency in your part of the world.

affiliate_link

Okay, I suppose we did exaggerate the thrill just a bit, but that is what makes it fun. If you want to learn more about our favorite stud in residence, Uli Emanuele, try his Facebook page.

BTW, I challenge you to read and watch the video in the Link below, a Letter Postmarked for Heaven. If you don’t get a lump in your throat after experiencing that, there is something wrong.

Citation:
(1) Base Jumping. Via Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BASE_jumping Retrieved 7/8/2015.

Advertisements

Base Jumping Crash Caught on Video

Our video today shows Jeb Corliss, one of the world’s best base jumpers, crashing into a ridge on January 16th on Table Mountain in South Africa as his jump goes horribly wrong.

The video is embedded so that it will begin at 1 minute and four seconds into the vid, which is the beginning of Corliss’ ill-fated jump. We recommend that you click on the full screen icon in the lower right corner of the vid to enable the best shot of the crash.

Because it is YouTube technology that allows us to pop into the video at a specific time slot, it may not work properly on all web browsers. If that happens, then simply paste the link into your browser’s URL address and watch it on YouTube.

And yes, Corliss surprisingly survived the mishap suffering only a broken leg, a broken ankle, some broken toes and bumps and bruises while spending the last five weeks in a South Africa hospital.

Corliss’ injuries are minor compared with what might have occurred. The fact that he survived at all is quite amazing considering that he hit the ridge at 120 miles per hour. Of course, Corliss fully intends to continue jumping once his injuries heal.

“The only reason I’m getting better is so that I can jump again,” Corliss said describing his motivation for healing his injuries.  “That’s what I do.  There’s absolutely nothing in this world that’s going to stop me from jumping.”

HBO Sports with Bryant Gumbel filmed the crash, and Corliss has posted his version of the accident at Jeb Corliss – Grounded. ABC News’ Nightline has also presented the best version of the accident I have seen on its show. I will post that link when it becomes available.